Home | About us Teachers & Coaches Training Facilities Life in China Dates & Fees | How to apply | FAQ | Contact us Links
  Tai Chi (Taiji) Course
  Daoyin Qigong Course
  Wushu (Taolu) Course
  Traditional Kung Fu
  Taiji Softball (Rouliqiu)
  Shaolin Temple Training
  Training at Wudang
  Sanshou (Sanda)
  Mulan Style Course
  Summer Courses 2017
  Private Training in China
  China Trips 2017
  Summer Camps 2017
Cultural Courses
    Chinese Language
    Chinese Calligraphy
    Chinese Medicine
    Musical Instruments
    Chinese Cooking
    Chinese Culture


SCIC Photos
 
SCIC Videos

 

Newsletters

2012 New SCIC Wushu, Tai Chi Programs. Including 15 classes a week course, 21 classes a weeek courses, Arfternoon Elective Classes that allow you to learn new styles, forms and fighting techniques.



     
 
 
     
  Beijing:  
(+86186) 1006 9300
  Kunming:  
(+86182) 0880 2137
martialarts@scicbeijing.com



Choose from two types of accommodation available at campus including single rooms and shared rooms.

Our Accommodation

 

What is Chinese Martial Arts?

 


Beijing  |   Shanghai  |   Shaolin Temple  |   Wudang Mt  |   Chen Village |   Zhengzhou  |  Guangzhou |  Hangzhou |   Kunming  |   Chengdu |   Hong Kong



Tai Chi Chuan (Taiji Quan)

Tai Chi Ch'uan (meaning 'Supreme Ultimate Fist') is an internal Chinese martial art based on Taoist ideas of yin and yang, or 'softness' and 'hardness'. Rather than meeting an attack head-on with physical strength Tai Chi advocates flowing and yielding to an attack and re-directing an opponent's force. Although in modern times it is increasingly practised for health benefits, Tai Chi is nevertheless a complete martial art incorporating the use of weapons, martial techniques and self-defence applications.


Chen style Tai Chi
(Taiji)

Tai Chi was founded in the 16th century in Chen Village in Henan Province. Chen-style Taiji is considered to be the parent form of the other major styles. It is known for a dynamic blend of slow, graceful movements and sudden releases of explosive power, known as fajing. Chen-style Taiji also includes the use of many weapons, such as the jian (straight sword) and the qiang (spear). This style of Taiji is considered to be the most martial of the five major styles.


Yang style Tai Chi
(Taiji )

Yang-style Taiji was created by Yang Luchan, who studied at Chen Village. After learning the Chen system he modified the art, removing many of the overt expressions of power and the more complex movement such as jumping and stamping. Yang-style is known for its softness, grace and gentleness, and is mostly practiced for health reasons. In his time, however, Yang was known as 'Yang the Invincible'. Yang-style is the most popular style of Taiji practiced today.


Wu Style Tai Chi
(Taiji Quan)

Wu-style Taiji was created by Wu Chuan-Yu, who was one of Yang's students in the 19th century. It is similar to Yang-style, except that the feet are generally closer together during movement and forms focus on smaller hand actions than the relatively wider Yang and Chen styles. There is also a martial focus on grappling, throwing, joint locking and pressure point attacks. The Chen, Yang and Wu styles are the most popular styles practiced all over the world.


Wu Style / Hao style Tai Chi (Taiji Quan)

The Wu/Hao-style was created by Wu Yu-hsiang, who also a student of Yang Luchan. Wu/Hao style is distinctive for its small, subtle movements and a focus on balance, sensitivity and internal chi development. It is a rare style today, and only a few schools exist.


Sun style Tai Chi (Taiji Quan)

Sun-style Taiji was created by Sun Lutang, who also studied Bagua and Hsingi. It has smooth, flowing movements and high stances. Among all the Taiji styles it has a unique method of footwork, as one foot follows the other in advancing or retreating. It also uses an open palm throughout the entirety of the form.  


Competition Styles Tai Chi (Taiji Quan)

Besides the five main family styles there is also the Yang 24-step, which is a simplified version of the longer Yang routines. It is suitable for beginners as it contains all the essential Taiji principles while still retaining a distinctive family flavour. There are also various competition forms, both empty-handed and with weapons. For example, the combined 42-step competition form was created in 1989 and combines elements from the Chen, Yang, Wu and Sun styles. It is now the standard Wushu competition form. There are also several well-known weapon forms such as the 32- and 42-step standardized sword forms.


Taiji Push Hands

Tai Chi training in any style generally includes form practice, self-defence applications and pushing-hands exercises. Pushing-hands is a two-person exercise method that develops a practitioner's reflexes, sensitivity, balance, co-ordination and timing. Training with another person allows students to adapt to incoming force and, rather than resisting with physical strength, redirect the push away from them in a smooth, co-ordinated movement. There are many different types of pushing-hands practiced in Taiji, and it can be done in different combinations with one or both hands, stationary or stepping, high, middle or low pushes, and finally 'free-style' practice which is the beginning of Taiji self-defence. 


Tai Chi Softball

Tai Chi Softball, or Taiji Rouliqiu, is an exercise combining the benefits of racket sports such as tennis and badminton with the internal aspects of Tai Chi. It was invented in 1991 by Professor Bai Rong of Shanxi University.

It is played with smooth, flowing movements that is said to improve circulation, flexibility, agility and hand-to-eye co-ordination. Players use a special racket covered with a rubber surface, red on one side and blue on the other. Several different types of balls can be used, normally a small rubber one with the centre filled with sand. Due to the nature of the equipment the ball cannot be returned by direct force, but instead must be caught and then returned in a gentle movement that uses the whole body.

Tai Chi Softball can be played by one person or more, with or without a net. It is mostly practiced in China, although more and more people now play it in Europe.

Today is it estimated that millions of people practice Tai Chi to reap its many benefits.


How to practice Tai Chi?

All Tai Chi movements are practiced in the same manner. In the beginning it may be difficult to perform the movements without stiffness, but with time and practice your body will loosen up and relax, and movement will be much easier. To begin, your body must be relaxed, and firmly rooted to the ground, with your weight in your lower pelvis and legs. Your upper body should be free to move fluidly and gracefully. Each movement should be done with intention and a focused mind, rather than with a reliance on physical strength.

When moving through the form, your body should be properly balanced, your weight should remain low, your head and spine are held upright, and all your joints should be loose and moving freely. When stepping, take care not to overbalance yourself, and shift your center of gravity slowly. Breathe slowly and fully, with the stomach expanding outwards on inhalation and inwards on exhalation, in rhythm with your movements. Your legs should form a circle, there should be a gap under your armpits (the arms should not be tucked in close to your body), your arms should be rounded as though there was a circle in front of your body, and your eyes should be open. Focus on the qi or intention in your dantian (a spot two-fingertips below your navel) and imagine it circulating throughout your body.

As well as being relaxed, a practitioner should also know how to release energy, or 'fajing' as it is known in China. This does not mean hardening or stiffening as one might think, but rather a controlled explosion of force rather like a whip cracking or a wave crashing. A practitioner should be able to clearly express a contrast between softness and hardness, while retaining an element of both in either (for example, each fajing movement, while powerful, still contains softness, as it avoids being stiff or rigid).  
 
Realization and Fajing in Chen Taijiquan

The release of fajing is a characteristic of Chen Taijiquan, and is not found in the other traditional styles. All Chen forms include both yin and yang, or a mixture of hardness and softness. Performing Chen Taiji correctly requires a practitioner to have low stances, powerful, spring-like legs, and a consummate knowledge of both relaxation and the release of fajing.

To perform the explosive fajing movements requires a soft, relaxed body, because a rapid, powerful release of energy can only be generated by softness. (In this manner, from softness comes hardness, and hardness reverts back into softness.) Fajing can be done with a punch, kick, strike, or any other body movement, and requires the feet to be firmly rooted. Power is drawn up through the legs, the breath is inhaled, and then with a twisting and spiraling motion together with a powerful exhalation, the energy is issued forth.

Characteristics of Chen Style Tai Chi

Other characteristics of Chen Taiji are low stances and chan si jin (silk-reeling exercises). The latter are slow, coordinated movements done with the whole body, with the intention of strengthening the body and increasing internal strength. They are done in conjunction with form practice. 

Another important part of Chen Taiji is Push-Hands, a two person sensitivity exercise. Two practitioners face one another and, after crossing arms, push backwards and forwards in an attempt to sense the other person's energy and intention, and so ward it off by body movement. In the later stages a more martial feel can be added, including striking, kicking, grabbing, locking and throwing. In common with all other aspects of Taiji, Push-Hands can only be understood if practiced with a relaxed body and a focused mind.

In order to be a complete Taiji practitioner, one must include several aspects in a training routine; conditioning and cardiovascular fitness, an element of physical strength, form training, silk-reeling, martial applications, push-hands and weapons training. In the beginning it may seem difficult to come to grips with, but with time and perseverance skill and internal energy will begin to develop. Then there is no end point to be reached, only further development. 

Tai Chi, or Taijiquan, means 'supreme ultimate fist', and is also known as 'internal strength boxing'. It can be practiced for health reasons, such as by the elderly or anyone wishing for improved health and immunity to disease, or by martial artists wishing to expand their repertoire and widen their training regime.

Irrespective of a practitioner's goals, practicing Tai Chi will exercise the whole body, improve circulation, strengthen limbs and joints, calm the mind, and improve energy flow through the meridians. The cardiovascular, digestive, muscular, skeletal and other systems of the body will all be strengthened and enjoy higher function, and practitioners will have more energy.
Another important part of Chen Taiji is Push-Hands, a two person sensitivity exercise. Two practitioners face one another and, after crossing arms, push backwards and forwards in an attempt to sense the other person's energy and intention, and so ward it off by body movement. In the later stages a more martial feel can be added, including striking, kicking, grabbing, locking and throwing. In common with all other aspects of Taiji, Push-Hands can only be understood if practiced with a relaxed body and a focused mind.

In order to be a complete Taiji practitioner, one must include several aspects in a training routine; conditioning and cardiovascular fitness, an element of physical strength, form training, silk-reeling, martial applications, push-hands and weapons training. In the beginning it may seem difficult to come to grips with, but with time and perseverance skill and internal energy will begin to develop. Then there is no end point to be reached, only further development. 

Tai Chi, or Taijiquan, means supreme ultimate fist, and is also known as 'internal strength boxing'. It can be practiced for health reasons, such as by the elderly or anyone wishing for improved health and immunity to disease, or by martial artists wishing to expand their repertoire and widen their training regime.

Irrespective of a practitioner's goals, practicing Tai Chi will exercise the whole body, improve circulation, strengthen limbs and joints, calm the mind, and improve energy flow through the meridians. The cardiovascular, digestive, muscular, skeletal and other systems of the body will all be strengthened and enjoy higher function, and practitioners will have more energy.
Tai Chi, or Taijiquan, means 'supreme ultimate fist', and is also known as 'internal strength boxing'. It can be practiced for health reasons, such as by the elderly or anyone wishing for improved health and immunity to disease, or by martial artists wishing to expand their repertoire and widen their training regime.

Irrespective of a practitioner's goals, practicing Tai Chi will exercise the whole body, improve circulation, strengthen limbs and joints, calm the mind, and improve energy flow through the meridians. The cardiovascular, digestive, muscular, skeletal and other systems of the body will all be strengthened and enjoy higher function, and practitioners will have more energy.

Back to Tai Chi Course >>

Other Styles of Chinese Martial Arts

Tai Chi Quan (Taiji Quan)
Wushu (Taolu)
Qigong (Daoyin)
Sanshou (Sanda)
Traditional Kung Fu
Mulan Styles
Wudang Martial Arts
Shaolin Kung Fu
Weapons
Animal  styles

 

Home I About us I Tai Chi Course I Wushu Course I Traditional Kung Fu I Sanshou Course I Daoyin Course I Mulan Styles I Tai Chi Tennis I Training in ShaolinI Training in Wudang
I Language Study I TCM CourseTraining Facilities I SCIC Masters I China Info I Newsletters I Links I How to apply I Contact us
Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of the SCIC-Beijing User Agreement and Privacy Policy.
Copyright 2003 - 2012. All Rights Reserved to SCIC-Beijing
SCIC Travel      SCIC Study      SCIC Martial Arts      SCIC Sports